Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Troubleshooting Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Troubleshooting Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Troubleshooting Tutorial

It’s been a while since the “Gimp Guillotine” work of Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Memory Tutorial (and if this is all confusingly new to you we recommend reading Gimp Guides to HTML Primer Tutorial, and up). During that time we’ve noticed …

… enough to make the blood boil! Even so, not surprising to us, because the subset of capabilities once you get to the “file:” webpage protocol off executing a downloaded email attachment, as distinct from the usual “http:” or “https:” protocols, is scarily limited. A bit akin to how limited Inline Email HTML is to the more usual Javascript-friendly HTML. The big issue with “file:” protocol is that the “relative URLs” so commonplace (and good to use) in “HTML http:or https: land” are not likely to work in “file: HTML land”. You need to have arranged the requisite mappings to absolute URLs (a PHP variable code intervention help …


if ((!empty($_SERVER['HTTPS']) && $_SERVER['HTTPS'] !== 'off') || $_SERVER['SERVER_PORT'] == 443) { // thanks to https://stackoverflow.com/questions/1175096/how-to-find-out-if-youre-using-https-without-serverhttps
$absurlprefix="https://" . $_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'] . "" . str_replace("~","",str_replace(":443~","",str_replace(":80~","",(":" . $_SERVER['SERVER_PORT'] . "~")))) . "" . str_replace("gimp_guillotine_followup.php","",explode("#",explode("?",$_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'])[0])[0]);
} else {
$absurlprefix="//" . $_SERVER['SERVER_NAME'] . "" . str_replace("~","",str_replace(":443~","",str_replace(":80~","",(":" . $_SERVER['SERVER_PORT'] . "~")))) . "" . str_replace("gimp_guillotine_followup.php","",explode("#",explode("?",$_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'])[0])[0]);
}

… used to change some “./” relative URL paths to absolute URL paths, the “https:” check (if code) being all about avoiding, in the web inspectors, the error messages starting with “Mixed Content”) before constructing the attachment HTML to succeed better. In this project, there are many many sources of media definition angst here. No worries though. We’ve got the (debugging) Web Inspectors of the modern browsers to help. And in this project, we got help from PHP “drill down” error reporting, as per …


ini_set('display_errors', false); // thanks to https://stackoverflow.com/questions/8440439/safely-catch-a-allowed-memory-size-exhausted-error-in-php


error_reporting(-1);

set_error_handler(function($code, $string, $file, $line) {
throw new ErrorException($string, null, $code, $file, $line);
});

We thought this might be a “Whac-A-Mole” exercise chasing down these errors, and yes, this panned out to be the case. So, just like we said with yesterday’s WordPress Blog Posting Trending Search Troubleshooting Tutorial

Fast forward to today’s troubleshooting work. We find “troubleshooting” and “debugging” requires a shift of mindset, often. This is because it can be tempting to see all this as “sideways” progress. It is a bit, but it is also a learning chance for you. Such as, at the end of it … “am I susceptible to this type of coding weakness into the future?”. That different mindset, for us, is to be as systematic and logical as you can be.

… perhaps that is a sign to tackle these troubleshooting issues in a bunch when you are feeling logical and calm!

We’ve prepared a stream of consciousness PDF slideshow for your perusal, of what we saw on addressing these issues, here, ending up with a changed gimp_guillotine_followup.php live run link to play with, to try all this out yourself.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Memory Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Memory Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Memory Tutorial

It’s a bit arrogant to say a sizeable piece of code you’ve written is “bug free”, especially if it involves user entered data, but it is a good aspiration, like marking at the 50 metre line, on the boundary, for Collingwood, in the grand final with 2 seconds on the clock and currently behind by five points, and scoring a goal after the siren in front of about 100000 people.

However, if you are writing in PHP some try/catch error checking (or exception handling) within sensitive parts of the code combined with a way to approach trapping memory overruns via the advice of this great link, thanks … some featured code lines for our situation with our GIMP Guillotine Follow Up web application …


ini_set('display_errors', false); // thanks to https://stackoverflow.com/questions/8440439/safely-catch-a-allowed-memory-size-exhausted-error-in-php

error_reporting(-1);

set_error_handler(function($code, $string, $file, $line) {
throw new ErrorException($string, null, $code, $file, $line);
});

… and then a shutdown register function, further down, as per …


register_shutdown_function(function(){
global $iferr;
$error = error_get_last();
if (null !== $error) {
if ($iferr != "./gimp_guillotine_followup.php" && $iferr != "") {
header("Location: " . $iferr . "" . urlencode($error['message']));
exit;
}
//echo 'Caught at shutdown ' . $error['message'];
}
});

… allows for memory overruns to be attended to via an alternative URL built up in that global $iferr variable and navigated to in that emergency.

But it’s not just this aspect to error checking that’s going on here. To implement this with that try/catch of major code parts can lead to “bugs” you’ve introduced being able to be found because you will either receive …

  • a blank screen … often due to missing $ variable indicator … can be a bit gobsmacking the first time (so unit test at regular intervals, is our advice)
  • an error message from your PHP try/catch that can show a code line
  • unexpected screen display can often be trapped at the client via the Console tab of your web browser’s Inspector tool

… as a set of ideas that can result in a much better “bragging rights” position so far as claiming “bug free” PHP code.

As we intimated earlier, it is a coding choice offering the user flexibility and freedom (for those curious and more adventurous users) all the while trying to help out so that it is not the web server nor the user nor the system administrator who get into trouble with an entry the user inserts that sends a piece of PHP spiralling out of control.

And so with yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Zip Tutorial‘s work, here is the (PHP) exception handling based additional code for today’s live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php‘s changed code.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Zip Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Zip Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Zip Tutorial

We’re entering the Goldilocks Zone today as far as “onions of the 4th dimension” thoughts go with the recent GIMP Guillotine Follow Up web application we’ve been developing.

  • it’s too hot thinking we’ll find any “onions of the 4th dimension” approaches to the sharp, fiery, strong, pungent, aromatic PHP aspects to “processing” concepts with this web application … and …
  • it’s too cold thinking we’ll find any “onions of the 4th dimension” approaches to the cool and reserved “output” options we have … but …
  • it’s just right to add an onion into planet 442b‘s bouillabaisse of “input” option intrigue and mystique!

So what “input” idea could that be … robots unable to read blog posting titles? Yes, it’s the allowance for zip files as an “input” data option, as a single file repository idea for input image files. You might recall us last talking about PHP’s talent with zip files when we presented Zipfiles in PHP Media Gallery Synchronize Tutorial? Well, we’re pretty keen on, and find it appealing, the idea of a …

  • single “input” (zip) “stream” … to match …
  • the single “output” (HTML) email attachment ideas of sharing

… as enticements for user use, in terms of simplicity of use (and the saving of disk space … as we hear from all those web server system administrators out there).

In broad brush terms, how do you “slot in” zipfile functionality? Two PHP functions become “our[PHPfunctionName]”, those being …

  • glob() always becomes ourglob() …

    function ourglob($ofwhat) {
    global $zipfile, $ziparrwh, $ziparrc, $ziparr, $fspec, $ext, $width, $height;
    if ($zipfile == "") {
    return glob($ofwhat);
    } else {
    $zip = zip_open($zipfile);
    if ($zip) {
    while ($zip_entry = zip_read($zip)) {
    $ourfilename=zip_entry_name($zip_entry);
    $regexpok=0;
    if (strpos($ourfilename, "_MACOSX/") === false) {
    $regexp="/^[\S]" . str_replace('[\s\S]?','[\s\S]*',str_replace('*','[\s\S]?',str_replace('?',',',str_replace('%',',',str_replace('.','[.]',$ofwhat))))) . "$/";
    $regexpok=preg_match($regexp, explode("/",$ourfilename)[-1 + sizeof(explode("/",$ourfilename))]);
    if ($regexpok !== 0) {
    if ($ext == "") $ext="." . explode(".", $ourfilename)[-1 + sizeof(explode(".", $ourfilename))];
    array_push($ziparr, $ourfilename);
    $isc=zip_entry_read($zip_entry, zip_entry_filesize($zip_entry));
    $im_php = imagecreatefromstring($isc);
    $width = imagesx($im_php);
    $height = imagesy($im_php);
    imagedestroy($im_php);
    array_push($ziparrwh, '' . $width . ',' . $height);
    array_push($ziparrc, $isc);
    }
    }
    }
    zip_close($zip);
    }
    return $ziparr;
    }
    }
  • file_get_contents() sometimes becomes ourfile_get_contents() …

    function ourfile_get_contents($ourfilename) {
    global $zipfile, $ziparrc, $ziparr, $ext;
    if ($zipfile == "") {
    return file_get_contents($ourfilename);
    } else if (sizeof($ziparrc) == sizeof($ziparr)) {
    for ($iop=0; $iop<sizeof($ziparr); $iop++) {
    if ($ziparr[$iop] == $ourfilename) {
    $zas=$ziparrc[$iop];
    $ziparrc[$iop]="";
    return $zas;
    }
    }
    return "";
    } else {
    $zip = zip_open($zipfile);
    if ($zip) {
    while ($zip_entry = zip_read($zip)) {
    $thisfilename=zip_entry_name($zip_entry);
    if ($thisfilename == $ourfilename) {
    $zhuh=zip_entry_read($zip_entry, zip_entry_filesize($zip_entry));
    zip_close($zip);
    return $zhuh;
    }
    }
    zip_close($zip);
    }
    }
    return "";
    }

This zip file work adds onto yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up GD Filter Tutorial‘s work, and here is the (PHP) zip input file based additional code for today’s live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php‘s changed code.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up GD Filter Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up GD Filter Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up GD Filter Tutorial

With regard to today’s (PHP) GD Filter functionality (additions to the GIMP Guillotine Follow Up web application) we ask you to please not get bored with another angle, or view, of image filtering, here. The more intervention points you can develop with programming the better, because when you are asked to achieve a solution, the more you are familiar with, the better it will be for your work and peace of mind and flexibility as a programmer.

Today’s GD image library based work we’ve referenced many times, as it is pretty useful to be able to manipulate image data into other image data and decide whether you want to …

  • write this image data out to a web page HTML element
  • leave it as a file on the web server
  • use it in an attachment in an email
  • use it to determine a data URI that goes into a webpage and an interim file be used for this but not retained

… and as you may have guessed above, yes, we are using that last of those options (and please know there are many others) to construct a whole swathe of new functionality that intervenes our PHP method (a function called “new_content” changed for this, and at other places referenced much more often for when we are constructing data URIs, it can be thought of now as “data URI central”) of creating data URIs from web server files to say that if the user has selected a (PHP) GD mode of use we will intervene before the usual PNG data URI is created, and instead, use the PHP GD library of function calls to create whole new “filtering” (plus “flip”) functionality ideas (and thanks to this webpage too) as per …

  • emboss
  • edge
  • negative edge
  • sharpen
  • box blur
  • negate
  • colourize red
  • colourize green
  • colourize blue
  • colourize
  • pixellate
  • smooth
  • contrast
  • brightness
  • sketchy
  • flip vertical
  • flip horizontal
  • flip

In summary, adding onto the recent Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Animate Tutorial work, here is the (PHP) GD library based additional code for today’s SVG Animate work with live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php‘s changed code.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Animate Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Animate Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Animate Tutorial

Continuing on with the SVG ideas within our GIMP Follow Up (image manipulation and display, all with data URL) that we left off yesterday with Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Filter Tutorial, not only can SVG elements involve …

  • filter … but, as we show today, they can also use …
  • animate

… to introduce SVG animation into the thought patterns here. And again, you can have filter and animate involved, so we can have a blurred but animated SVG as below …

Email //www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*&include=&transition=Process+with+keyframe+Transition+CSS+Animation&style=+div%2C+.iimg+{+-webkit-filter%3A+blur(4px)%3B+filter%3A+blur(4px)%3B+}+

… and as you can glean from the right hand side of today’s tutorial picture we intervene at the SVG element’s “defs” (header) section’s “pattern” element to “animate” via “from” and “to” properties applied to “x” co-ordinate and “y” co-ordinate for a “dur” (duration) in seconds, to make this SVG animation happen.

Along the way, today, we’ve also refined an annoyance we discovered where we might “double up” on our CSS applications of usage because with the previous selector arrangement of …


div, img { }

… the CSS could “double up” with display modes where a parent div element nested img elements. So we add some class=iimg (on our “Div Margin use scenario) to be able to avoid “double ups” via the new selector arrangement …


div, .iimg { }

Here is the SVG additional code for today’s SVG Animate work with live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php‘s changed code.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Filter Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Filter Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Filter Tutorial

Yesterday with Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Tutorial we started down the road with some SVG functionality to our GIMP Follow Up (ie. what we can do with a sequence of related images, and a server side language like PHP) web application and along that now long and winding road we touched on some filters to, at the client side CSS level, we could change the look of “lots” of our display “looks” we’ve been building up.

That “lots” of above did not “generally” apply to SVG until with some, today, we’re going to show you that SVG does indeed have a lot of its own filters (and here we include “transform” as well), the two we are going to incorporate today being …

… but there are many more you can read about at SVG: Scalable Vector Graphics | MDN should you want to find out more.

How do they get worked in? In the SVG element’s defs section we add new SVG filter definitions that include a unique “id”. Then in the non defs parts (but alas “path” does not seem to work) you include a parameter of the form …


filter=‘url(#[SVGfilterID])’

… and then Bob becomes your uncle and Fanny becomes your aunt.

This is the SVG additional code for today’s SVG Filter work with live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php‘s changed code.

To simulate the scenario of today’s tutorial picture (with another Firefox web browser Web Inspector view) take a dekko of …

//www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*&include=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-0-0.png%2C.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-1-0.png%2C.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-2-1.png&svgnmw=Process+with+SVG+Polygons&style=+div%2C+img+{+-webkit-filter%3A+blur(4px)%3B+filter%3A+blur(4px)%3B+}+


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up SVG Tutorial

Today’s SVG day adding onto the progress from yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Image Transformations Tutorial.

What’s SVG? Read from Wikipedia below …

Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML-based vector image format for two-dimensional graphics with support for interactivity and animation. The SVG specification is an open standard developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) since 1999. SVG images and their behaviors are defined in XML text files.

… and know it is a very important way to express graphical information online today, especially if your data has a vector based source. Even without that vector based editor (eg. Inkscape) involvement you can take raster based image data, and express it in an SVG way. Our data URIs in our “GIMP Follow Up” are in raster based form, but they can still be expressed in …

  • an SVG element’s …
  • defs definition element section’s …
  • pattern element with a unique id nesting …
  • image element’s xlink:href property’s data URI … then that …
  • SVG (non defs part) element’s …
  • polygon elements can refer to corresponding data URI background data via their fill property’s (corresponding) url(#[patternElementID])

SVG co-ordinate systems making sense for our GIMP Guillotine “jigsaw” feel depend on …

  • an overall SVG viewBox property value 0 0 [totalWidth] [totalHeight] … and then for each …
  • polygon element viewBox property value [Xoffset] [Yoffset] [width] [height] where width and height are those of the “jigsaw piece” and Xoffset and Yoffset are relative to positioning of elements that precede them

Take a look at the right hand side of today’s tutorial picture to see more detail of the (outerHTML) look of such a SVG element, seen in Firefox’s Inspector web inspector.

Here is the SVG additional code for today’s live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php‘s changed code.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Image Transformations Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Image Transformations Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Image Transformations Tutorial

Following today’s work along with yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Image Filters Tutorial we now have two strands of CSS based functionality …

  • yesterday’s CSS filter property work … and …
  • today’s CSS transform property work

… the latter there for your more geometrically based concepts as per …

Part of today’s live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php‘s changed code is to allow for multiple combinations between and among the “filter” and “transform” CSS property functionalities.

How do you cater for multiple “filter” or “transform” CSS property functionality syntax? A space character can separate.

… and/or we can involve “filter” multiple actions as well as “transform” ones as per …

How do we allow for multiple “filter” or “transform” CSS property functionality definition by the user? We set a fairly large setTimeout(fc, 8000) mode of calling it into play. Then during that 8 second delay, should the user click another “filter” or “transform” CSS button, this CSS is appended to whatever is already there and a Javascript function tidies this up before the HTML navigation is made, via …


function restyle() {
var ov=document.getElementById('style').value;
var ihuha=0;
var origov=ov;
var huha=ov.split('-webkit-transform:');
if (huha.length > 2) {
for (ihuha=eval(-1 + huha.length); ihuha>=2; ihuha--) {
ov=ov.replace('-webkit-transform:' + huha[1].split(';')[0] + ';', '-webkit-transform:' + huha[ihuha].split(';')[0] + ' ' + huha[1].split(';')[0] + ';');
ov=ov.replace('-webkit-transform:' + huha[ihuha].split(';')[0] + ';', '');
huha=ov.split('-webkit-transform:');
}
}
huha=ov.split(' transform:');
if (huha.length > 2) {
for (ihuha=eval(-1 + huha.length); ihuha>=2; ihuha--) {
ov=ov.replace(' transform:' + huha[1].split(';')[0] + ';', ' transform:' + huha[ihuha].split(';')[0] + ' ' + huha[1].split(';')[0] + ';');
ov=ov.replace(' transform:' + huha[ihuha].split(';')[0] + ';', '');
huha=ov.split(' transform:');
}
}
huha=ov.split('-webkit-filter:');
if (huha.length > 2) {
for (ihuha=eval(-1 + huha.length); ihuha>=2; ihuha--) {
ov=ov.replace('-webkit-filter:' + huha[1].split(';')[0] + ';', '-webkit-filter:' + huha[ihuha].split(';')[0] + ' ' + huha[1].split(';')[0] + ';');
ov=ov.replace('-webkit-filter:' + huha[ihuha].split(';')[0] + ';', '');
huha=ov.split('-webkit-filter:');
}
}
huha=ov.split(' filter:');
if (huha.length > 2) {
for (ihuha=eval(-1 + huha.length); ihuha>=2; ihuha--) {
ov=ov.replace(' filter:' + huha[1].split(';')[0] + ';', ' filter:' + huha[ihuha].split(';')[0] + ' ' + huha[1].split(';')[0] + ';');
ov=ov.replace(' filter:' + huha[ihuha].split(';')[0] + ';', '');
huha=ov.split(' filter:');
}
}
if (origov != ov) { document.getElementById('style').value=ov.replace(/div\, img \{ \}/g,' '); }
}


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Image Filters Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Image Filters Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Image Filters Tutorial

Is it ironic that a blog posting about GIMP should be letting applications like GIMP take a holiday … Tahiti sounds good … while CSS styling can take front stage with today’s improvements on the recent Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Border and Multiple Image Background Tutorial adding some image filter “smarts” today, given that GIMP can achieve this too?

These CSS filters (we use on our HTML div and img elements) are amazing, and we talked about them at some length with CSS3 Filters Primer Tutorial’>CSS3 Filters Primer Tutorial some time back, as much as anything because you can achieve just great affects just with a couple of lines of CSS code.

Up to now with our PHP based “GIMP Guillotine Follow Up” web application we’ve concentrated on either Javascript DOM or inline CSS (via an HTML element’s style property) to get things achieved with the imagery perhaps output via the GIMP Guillotine technique … though we never said you HAD to use GIMP Guillotine, as you are just asked for any old imagery file specification … here. But the fact is, serverside languages such as PHP sit a layer on top of all client (webpage) HTML and Javascript and CSS considerations, so just as we think PHP and Javascript are the best of pals, depending on how you and PHP arrange the cocktail party seating arrangements, I’ve seen many a party where PHP and CSS get schloshed together with nairy a bad word spoken … though have seen some sideways glances from Ajax under the kitchen sink.

Example CSS image filter URLs and example executions follow …

Yet again we hope you can see more of what we mean by trying out the live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today changed in this way.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Border and Multiple Image Background Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Border and Multiple Image Background Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Border and Multiple Image Background Tutorial

Developing on the work of the previous Gimp Guillotine Follow Up CSS keyframes Transition Tutorial today we add to the functionalities with …

  • multiple background image div element display (via background-image: url([dataURIimage]) // the Javascript DOM equivalent, that is) … and …
  • random animated border image to div element display (via border-image-source: url([dataURIimage]) // the Javascript DOM equivalent, that is)

… still calling on our data URL ways, so keeping it “mobile” manperson and (email attachment) “transportable” M.A.N.good buddy … roger that.

No multiple image borders? Yes, our research here plucked out this small disappointment, so we found the next best thing to do (with the multiple images available) was to at least randomly animate these border images via Javascript setTimeout timer calls.

With the “multiple background image div element display” you also need to attend to …

  • background-repeat: no-repeat; // the Javascript DOM equivalent, that is
  • background-position: [leftOffset]px [topOffset]px; // the Javascript DOM equivalent, that is

… to not have the background images bunch themselves up in a muddled way.

To vary the “random animated border image to div element display” you can optionally attend to …

  • border-image-width: [width]px; // the Javascript DOM equivalent, that is
  • border-image-slice: [slice]px; // the Javascript DOM equivalent, that is

… that you can see in action code-wise with Javascript …


var xob=null,xbvsb='';
function zworkit() {
xworkit(xob,xbvsb);
}
function xworkit(ob,bvsb) {
var bretval='', cretval='', dretval='', bcomma='', bchoice=Math.floor(Math.random() * 200), bslice=Math.floor(Math.random() * 100);
var mr=Math.floor(Math.random() * xparlist.length);
for (ixparlist=0; ixparlist<xparlist.length; ixparlist++) {
if (bvsb == 'border') {
if (ixparlist == mr) {
ob.style.borderImageWidth='' + bchoice + 'px';
ob.style.borderImageSlice='' + bslice + 'px';
ob.style.borderRepeat='repeat';
bretval+=bcomma + " url('" + document.getElementById(xparlist[ixparlist]).src + "')";
if (xob != null) {
ob.style.borderImageSource=" url('" + document.getElementById(xparlist[ixparlist]).src + "')";
}
xob=ob;
xbvsb=bvsb;
setTimeout(zworkit, 4000);
}
} else {
cretval+=bcomma + ' no-repeat';
dretval+=bcomma + ' ' + eval(-20 + eval('' + document.getElementById('lefttop').value.split(',')[eval(ixparlist * 2)])) + 'px ' + eval(-20 + eval('' + document.getElementById('lefttop').value.split(',')[eval(ixparlist * 2 + 1)])) + 'px';
bretval+=bcomma + " url('" + document.getElementById(xparlist[ixparlist]).src + "')";
bcomma=',';
}
}
if (cretval != '') {
ob.style.backgroundRepeat=cretval;
ob.style.backgroundPosition=dretval;
}
return bretval;
}

We hope you can see more of what we mean by trying out the live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today changed in this way.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up CSS keyframes Transition Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up CSS keyframes Transition Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up CSS keyframes Transition Tutorial

A while back we presented a series of web application ideas that do away with Javascript (ie. only needing HTML and CSS) to perform some functionality of interest. In that series we finished up with Missing Javascript Audio on Unmute Tutorial where through this series we touched on …

… and these feature today with our functionality extensions to yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up PDF Slideshow and Video Tutorial where, again, we have a ‘piece of code modelled on a big long “template” piece of HTML that we make substitutions into to create the functionality’.

We found that this was all fine and good to create an overall animation “blob” of webpage activity, but what was in that “template” didn’t help reflect GIMP Guillotine left and top “offsets” within that animation. To do this with our HTML div element, this, along with the change of background content, made us introduce some Javascript DOM changes where …

  • [divObject].style.backgroundImage=”url(‘” + dataURIofImageVar + “‘)”;
  • [divObject].style.backgroundPosition=’ ‘ + parent.document.getElementById(‘lefttop’).value.split(‘,’)[eval(iparlist * 2)] + ‘px ‘ + parent.document.getElementById(‘lefttop’).value.split(‘,’)[eval(iparlist * 2 + 1)] + ‘px';

… as in the Javascript function controlled by setTimeout timer calls (to help animate) …


var parlist=['mondrian-1504681_640-0-0png','mondrian-1504681_640-1-0png','mondrian-1504681_640-2-0png','mondrian-1504681_640-2-1png','mondrian-1504681_640-2-2png'];
var divo=null;
var iparlist=0;
function workit() {
if (divo == null) {
divo=document.getElementsByTagName('div')[0];
}
if (iparlist >= parlist.length) iparlist=0;
divo.style.backgroundRepeat='no-repeat';
divo.style.backgroundPosition=' ' + parent.document.getElementById('lefttop').value.split(',')[eval(iparlist * 2)] + 'px ' + parent.document.getElementById('lefttop').value.split(',')[eval(iparlist * 2 + 1)] + 'px';
divo.style.backgroundImage="url('" + parent.document.getElementById(parlist[iparlist]).src + "')";
iparlist++;
setTimeout(workit, 6000);
}
setTimeout(workit, 500);

… the act of which starts the video below (if not playing click here for alternate playing method) …

Let’s catch up with some more URLs showing (and sharing) some recent scenarios below …

Send email to rmetcalfe15@gmail.com of the 5 Piet Mondrian image jigsaw pieces shown with an Inhouse Slideshow as the downloadable attachment HTML of that email …
https://www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*%23rmetcalfe15%40gmail.com%2B&include=&inhouseslideshow=Process+with+Inhouse+Slideshow#inhouseslideshowd
Send email to rmetcalfe15@gmail.com of the 5 Piet Mondrian image jigsaw pieces shown with an CSS keyframes Transition Animation as the downloadable attachment HTML of that email …
https://www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*%23rmetcalfe15%40gmail.com%2B&include=&transition=Process+with+keyframe+Transition+CSS+Animation
Show with an Inhouse Slideshow …
https://www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*&include=&inhouseslideshow=Process+with+Inhouse+Slideshow#inhouseslideshowd
Show with CSS keyframes Transition Animation …
https://www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*&include=&transition=Process+with+keyframe+Transition+CSS+Animation

Hopefully you can see more of what we mean at a live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today changed in this way.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up CSS keyframes Transition Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up PDF Slideshow and Video Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up PDF Slideshow and Video Tutorial

As the blog posting title intimates, adding onto yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Javascript DOM Animation Tutorial, today’s work looks at functionality to help create …

  • PDF slideshow
  • Inhouse style slideshow
  • Video

… and the top and bottom of these depend on, respectively, the amazing, the stupendous …

… that are looked for on the operating system (or web server) you are running the Gimp Guillotine Follow Up web application from, and if found offer HTML input type=submit methods of submitting the image file specification form.

We’ve talked about the fade in, fade out style of ffmpeg video before when we presented Firefox Inspector Debugging via Network Tab Primer Tutorial but today with variability within image sizes we found the additional switches like in the command below, necessary …


ffmpeg -loop 1 -t 5 -i /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-0-0.png -loop 1 -t 5 -i /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-1-0.png -loop 1 -t 5 -i /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-2-0.png -loop 1 -t 5 -i /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-2-1.png -loop 1 -t 5 -i /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-2-2.png -filter_complex "[0:v]scale=1280:720:force_original_aspect_ratio=decrease,pad=1280:720:(ow-iw)/2:(oh-ih)/2,setsar=1,fade=t=out:st=4:d=1[v0]; [1:v]scale=1280:720:force_original_aspect_ratio=decrease,pad=1280:720:(ow-iw)/2:(oh-ih)/2,setsar=1,fade=t=in:st=0:d=1,fade=t=out:st=4:d=1[v1]; [2:v]scale=1280:720:force_original_aspect_ratio=decrease,pad=1280:720:(ow-iw)/2:(oh-ih)/2,setsar=1,fade=t=in:st=0:d=1,fade=t=out:st=4:d=1[v2]; [3:v]scale=1280:720:force_original_aspect_ratio=decrease,pad=1280:720:(ow-iw)/2:(oh-ih)/2,setsar=1,fade=t=in:st=0:d=1,fade=t=out:st=4:d=1[v3]; [4:v]scale=1280:720:force_original_aspect_ratio=decrease,pad=1280:720:(ow-iw)/2:(oh-ih)/2,setsar=1,fade=t=in:st=0:d=1,fade=t=out:st=4:d=1[v4]; [v0][v1][v2][v3][v4]concat=n=5:v=1:a=0,format=yuv420p[v]" -map "[v]" /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/gimp_guillotine.mp4

… resulting in (if not playing click here for alternate playing method) …

The PDF slideshow creation is a doddle for ImageMagick, an example of a command line (via PHP exec) command being …


convert /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-0-0.png /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-1-0.png /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-2-0.png /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-2-1.png /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/mondrian-1504681_640-2-2.png /Applications/MAMP/htdocs/gimp_guillotine.pdf

… resulting in (if not showing click here for alternate method) …

And our Internal Slideshow is a piece of code modelled on a big long “template” piece of HTML that we make substitutions into to create the functionality (so click relevant button to make this happen) …

Again, we hope you can see more of what we mean at a live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today changed in this way.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Javascript DOM Animation Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Javascript DOM Animation Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Javascript DOM Animation Tutorial

Adding to yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Email Attachment Tutorial we now want to add an “onions of the 4th dimension” layer on top “feel” to all this, by starting to think about animation functionality. We’re going to start out quite simply, and the simplest animation approach we can think of is …

  • have access to a bunch of image data URIs … check …
  • either …
    1. progressively show … or …
    2. one at a time show

    … this imagery at a point of time as a (pseudo Javascript) …

    document.body.backgroundImage="URL('" + thatDataURIVar + "')"

    … idea the timing of which can be controlled by the Javascript setTimeout timer method

As you can imagine “one at a time” is a relative doddle, but “progressively show” is not quite such a doddle. But it is an uncle’s doddle if ahead of time you had …

  1. set up an array and an index variable pointing to a relevant index into it …

    var canvascset=[];
    var icanvascset=0;
    var elem=document.getElementById('mycanvas');
    var context=elem.getContext('2d');
  2. wherever in the code as it was, you had used the [canvasContext].drawImage you canvascset.push([thatCommand]) adding onto that array as per

    canvascset.push("context.drawImage(ourdocumentgetElementById('img" + eval(-1 + myimagec.split(',' + pfix + '-' + icol + '-' + irow + ext)[0].split(',').length) + "'), " + left + "," + top + ");");
    context.drawImage(ourdocumentgetElementById('img' + eval(-1 + myimagec.split(',' + pfix + '-' + icol + '-' + irow + ext)[0].split(',').length)), left, top);
  3. then set up some “a” links using the Javascript function featuring setTimeout timing functionality, and good ol’ eval as per …

    function canvasanimation() {
    if (canvascset.length > 0 && icanvascset >= 0) {
    if (icanvascset <= 0) {
    icanvascset=0;
    context.clearRect(0, 0, elem.width, elem.height);
    eval(canvascset[0]);
    document.body.style.backgroundImage=\"url('\" + elem.toDataURL() + \"')\";
    icanvascset++;
    if (clearalot) {
    setTimeout(canvasanimation, 600);
    } else {
    setTimeout(canvasanimation, 3000);
    }
    } else if (icanvascset > canvascset.length) {
    icanvascset=0;
    if (clearalot) {
    setTimeout(canvasanimation, 1200);
    } else {
    setTimeout(canvasanimation, 6000);
    }
    } else {
    if (clearalot) context.clearRect(0, 0, elem.width, elem.height);
    eval(canvascset[icanvascset]);
    document.body.style.backgroundImage=\"url('\" + elem.toDataURL() + \"')\";
    icanvascset++;
    if (clearalot) {
    setTimeout(canvasanimation, 600);
    } else {
    setTimeout(canvasanimation, 3000);
    }
    }
    } else if (canvascset.length > 0) {
    icanvascset=0;
    }
    }

    … noting how the animations can be stopped by setting that indexing variable negative (at other functionality events)

The joy of this Javascript DOM animation approach is that the creation of any new media is avoided, hence our assertion that this is perhaps the easiest animation idea we can think of. More to come, though.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Email Attachment Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Email Attachment Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Email Attachment Tutorial

We’ve got some good news for followers of the latest thread of blog postings following up on Gimp Guillotine usage thoughts as exemplified by yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Table and Image Map Tutorial efforts. Up to today, the “accountability” score was not so great without a live run opportunity to show you what we mean. But today we’ve decided to open up all but the “GIMP Listening” aspects of this web application live to the rjmprogramming.com.au domain. Why the change of heart? Well, now it’s worth it, with the sharing email dual options …

  • email a canvas element based overall image view as an email attachment … as well as, now, by appending a “+” to your email declaration …
  • email all that you are seeing on the screen at the time as an email attachment

… because, now, we believe we have a useful enough “tool” for collaboration purposes, not that we are saying it is no longer a “use this PHP with a local web server like MAMP” proposition as well. It is, but you can learn a bit in advance trying out what you’ve been seeing us talk about here over the last few days, because we’ve also uploaded to the rjmprogramming.com.au domain those Piet Mondrian inspired image jigsaw parts which Pixabay webpage, thanks, helped us create via GIMP’s “Image -> Transform -> Guillotine” functionality quite a few days ago now.

The other issue which makes all this feasible is the involvement of PHP (though perhaps HTML and Javascript and Ajax might swing it too) being able to express the web application’s image (img elements) totally as data URIs, and so be totally mobile and transportable to email with HTML email attachments, which continue their functionality, being as they don’t require the http nor https protocol absolute URL need.

Another aspect that might have been gnawing away at the patience of people following this blog posting thread was the dumbness of the HTML textarea element we’d presented as a displayer of image jigsaw filename information. To us, to make this part of the web application much more useful was to turn the HTML textarea element into an HTML select (dropdown) “multiple” mode element which allows the user to work with the “display subset” of the whole set (though behind the scenes they are all there courtesy of the CSS usage of visibility:hidden; (leaving in whitespace) rather than display:none; (scrunching up whitespace) styling which you can read more about at CSS Style Display and Visibility Tall Poppies Tutorial) as well.

This all means we can show you some URLs showing (and sharing) some of these scenarios below too, which we will now, rather than later … know you’re in a hurry …

Send email to rmetcalfe15@gmail.com of the 5 Piet Mondrian image jigsaw pieces shown with a canvas based background image all as the downloadable attachment HTML of that email …
https://www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*%23rmetcalfe15%40gmail.com%2B&include=&canvasnorepeat=Process+with+Canvas+Background+Image+No+Repeat
Send email to rmetcalfe15@gmail.com of the first and second and fourth of the 5 Piet Mondrian image jigsaw pieces shown with a div margin based background image all as the downloadable attachment HTML of that email …
https://www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*%23rmetcalfe15%40gmail.com%2B&include=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-0-0.png%2C.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-1-0.png%2C.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-2-1.png&divmarginuse=Process+with+Top+Div+Margin+Use
Show with a canvas based background image …
https://www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*&include=&canvasnorepeat=Process+with+Canvas+Background+Image+No+Repeat
Show with the first and second and fourth of the 5 Piet Mondrian image jigsaw pieces shown with a div margin based background image, and below that as an iframe view …
https://www.rjmprogramming.com.au/PHP/gimp_guillotine_followup.php?filespec=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-*-*.*g*&include=.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-0-0.png%2C.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-1-0.png%2C.%2Fmondrian-1504681_640-2-1.png&divmarginuse=Process+with+Top+Div+Margin+Use

We hope you can see more of what we mean at a live run‘s PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today changed in this way.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Table and Image Map Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Table and Image Map Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Table and Image Map Tutorial

The recent Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Canvas Tutorial had us with “jigsaw pieced together” image representations for …

  • Div Margin
  • Canvas

… and today we add to that …

  • Table
  • Image Map

… inspired by existant GIMP functionalities, respectively …

  • Filters -> Web -> Slice…
  • Filters -> Web -> Image Map…

We service these new functionalities by new “a” link hashtags. We also add to the viewing adaptability by encasing all these display options within the (introduced with HTML5) details tag and its nested summary tag “revealers”. These great HTML elements can help clarify situations where there are many choices but the user is in all likelihood wanting to focus on just one at a time. These details/summary tags are initially set “closed” for lack of clutter but as a user clicks on an associated “a” link hashtag they are “opened” on the fly via (the (pseudo) Javascript) …


document.getElementById([detailTagObjectID]).open=true;

So see how we got to the new PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today changed in this way and, again, it is more than likely you will use this PHP with a local web server like MAMP.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Canvas Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Canvas Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Canvas Tutorial

The second of the non-primer tutorial themes to improve and build on yesterday’s Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Div Margin Tutorial


HTML div element housing HTML img elements (no position: absolute like we like so much for overlay work) using style property margin-left and HTML br (line break) element (which sometimes requires negative margin-top tweaking)

… involves the ever useful canvas element introduced with HTML5 as per …


HTML canvas element object's drawImage method helps draw HTML img elements positionally so as to recreate the original image look from constituent "jigsaw image element" HTML img elements

Let’s take a step back, reread Emoji Border or Background Image Canvas Tutorial

What’s the big deal with the HTML5 canvas element? For a few things …

  • the HTML5 canvas element right click or two finger gesture functionality includes Copy options …
  • the canvas can collect both images and text and be able to summarize that into …
  • a single image can be derived from the canvas element, encapsulating its contents … so that …
  • the canvas element can export that graphical content into a data URI that involves no absolute URLs … and so ties in nicely with …
  • email attachments can go hand in hand with the canvas element via a serverside function such as PHP’s mail function to enhance sharing functionalities

… because it is both pertinent to this project and shows how the canvas element is such a great generic “graphic” sharing element. Express all its content by data URIs and you have a totally “mobile” and transportable container of graphical or pixel data.

The PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today changed for canvas use this way and it is more than likely you will use this PHP with a local web server like MAMP. We hope this gives you ideas, and please feel free to download this PHP.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Div Margin Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Div Margin Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Div Margin Tutorial

The first non-primer tutorial theme to improve and build on the recent Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Primer Tutorial are a series of representations to put the Gimp Guillotine “jigsaw image pieces” back together to make humpty dumpty … down, Nala … representations of the original image back for the user. Sounds a bit counterproductive, but these are all steps in a process to eventually be able to do quite a bit we hope. Today’s “first cab off the rank” representation is …


HTML div element housing HTML img elements (no position: absolute like we like so much for overlay work) using style property margin-left and HTML br (line break) element (which sometimes requires negative margin-top tweaking)

Gasp, how rudimentary! But sometimes the rudimentary things are the best. We display this “pieced back together original image” data (from the data you guillotined (which may not be the whole picture, as with today’s data we test)) in three different ways …

  • an “a” link hashtag navigates the user below the fold to the “pieced back together original image”
  • another “a” link hashtag navigates the user to a new window with the “pieced back together original image”
  • a new type=submit name=divmarginuse button of the HTML form is an alternate processing option that automatically “underlays” (you say underlay, I say overlay, we go) the “pieced back together original image” under whatever webpage data appears at the top left, with an opacity less than 1 (ie. 0.5 to show with some transparency), this “underlay” being position:absolute but not asking that of an pre-existant webpage data … it is added dynamically via Javascript DOM techniques

This last option’s usage we find pretty efficient, and you can read more on this at HTML Multiple Form Multiple Submit Buttons Primer Tutorial. As you might surmise, we’ll be adding more of these as time goes on, and we dip our toes into the myriad number of representations of this “pieced back together original image” data we visit.

The PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today changed this way it is more than likely you will use this PHP with a local web server like MAMP (though into the future we may offer a command line mode of use).

Hopefully today’s tutorial picture makes what we are talking about here more clear for you.


Previous relevant Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Primer Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Primer Tutorial

Gimp Guillotine Follow Up Primer Tutorial

Still on yesterday’s Gimp Image Map HTML Primer Tutorial‘s Gimp themes do you remember us saying, relating to GIMP

… precursor to being able to break an image into component parts via “Image -> Transform -> Guillotine” or the more enticing, for those web developers out there, “Filters -> Web -> Slice” which effectively does what Guillotine does and writes out some HTML in the form of an HTML table element that includes some “a” link opportunities to do something special for individual images of the new “image jigsaw” surrounded by Guides

… down below? Well, yes, today is a revisit to the “Guillotine” bit of that, because it is all well and good to use “Filters -> Web -> Slice” for a fait accompli HTML table “slicing” approach, but as you can imagine, there are lots of reasons, such as responsive design, why you might want to stop at the “Guillotine” “just give me the images, manperson” stage and from there, do your own thingthang, manperson.

We’re just starting down the road of this today in our “Primer” tutorial, just being able to either …

  1. image creation method …
    • start GIMP and listen out for new images created … we’re hoping via “Image -> Transform -> Guillotine” … or …
    • specify your own filespec of images … we’re hoping got there via “Image -> Transform -> Guillotine”
  2. list those image files …
  3. show those image files

GIMP being a desktop application, you might have guessed that we’d use a serverside language for this work, and yes, we’re using PHP gimp_guillotine_followup.php today, but don’t show you any live run links because it is more than likely you will use this PHP with a local web server like MAMP (though into the future we may offer a command line mode of use).

So please feel free to download that PHP and/or see its approach via today’s tutorial picture.


Previous relevant Gimp Image Map HTML Primer Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Image Map HTML Primer Tutorial

Gimp Image Map HTML Primer Tutorial

As we intimated yesterday with Gimp Guides to HTML Primer Tutorial regarding the GIMP image editor’s “Filters -> Web” menu …

… you would also see an “Image Map” option helping out in a similar fashion to the stupendous mobilefish functionality.

… and so we are here today to show you how that functionality works via a PDF slideshow for your perusal. There are options to shape what goes into the resultant HTML’s map element’s area (as rectangle or ellipse or polygon) tag href property link types as per …

… as a very extensive ideas list on top of options to define event logic for …

  • onmouseover
  • onmouseout
  • onfocus
  • onblur

… and that there is the option to define exact co-ordinates, and to define the alt attribute and HTML iframe name as applicable, also.

We’ll leave you with the resultant HTML we had GIMP create for us as a result of the goings on in that PDF slideshow (noting that the only adjustment to HTML in out TextWrangler editing session was to point at the image img element src attribute location properly), and we hope this is of benefit for you …


<img src="mondrian-1504681_640.jpg" width="640" height="480" border="0" usemap="#map" />
 
<map name="map">
<!-- #$-:Image map file created by GIMP Image Map plug-in -->
<!-- #$-:GIMP Image Map plug-in by Maurits Rijk -->
<!-- #$-:Please do not edit lines starting with "#$" -->
<!-- #$VERSION:2.3 -->
<!-- #$AUTHOR:User -->
<area shape="rect" coords="0,1,36,132" href="mailto:?body=w_1_1&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Read%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="51,0,118,128" href="mailto:?body=y_2_1&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="136,1,295,133" href="mailto:?body=b_3_1&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="310,1,500,132" href="mailto:?body=r_4_1&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="514,0,566,131" href="mailto:?body=y_5_1&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="583,1,596,130" href="mailto:?body=w_6_1&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="0,146,36,293" href="mailto:?body=w_1_2&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="50,145,119,294" href="mailto:?body=w_2_2&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="134,146,295,292" href="mailto:?body=w_3_2&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="310,146,375,294" href="mailto:?body=w_4_2&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="391,147,498,294" href="mailto:?body=w_5_2&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="514,144,567,294" href="mailto:?body=r_6_2&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="582,146,597,385" href="mailto:?body=w_7_2&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="0,309,36,479" href="mailto:?body=w_1_3&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="51,308,119,386" href="mailto:?body=w_2_3&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="133,307,374,385" href="mailto:?body=r_3_3&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="390,307,499,385" href="mailto:?body=w_4_3&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="514,309,569,384" href="mailto:?body=y_5_3&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="51,399,118,481" href="mailto:?body=b_2_4&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="132,400,375,479" href="mailto:?body=y_3_4&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="390,400,568,481" href="mailto:?body=w_4_4&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
<area shape="rect" coords="582,399,597,479" href="mailto:?body=w_5_4&subject=Mondrian%20Composition%20with%20Red%20Yellow%20and%20Blue" />
</map>


Previous relevant Gimp Guides to HTML Primer Tutorial is shown below.

Gimp Guides to HTML Primer Tutorial

Gimp Guides to HTML Primer Tutorial

The great GIMP image editor has several ways to create Guides, which are the precursor to being able to break an image into component parts via “Image -> Transform -> Guillotine” or the more enticing, for those web developers out there, “Filters -> Web -> Slice” which effectively does what Guillotine does and writes out some HTML in the form of an HTML table element that includes some “a” link opportunities to do something special for individual images of the new “image jigsaw” surrounded by Guides. Within the options of that last menu you would also see an “Image Map” option helping out in a similar fashion to the stupendous mobilefish functionality.

With this in mind, we almost immediately thought of the great Piet Mondrian and his rectangle paintings in primary colours, wondering if by now you could get image downloads of his work, given he died some time ago now. And yes, there at this Pixabay webpage, thanks, we were able to do that and download an image version of “Composition with Red Yellow and Blue” to open with GIMP.

Which ways, then, in GIMP, can you create Guides?

  • precise Horizontal or Vertical position specification in pixels (via Image -> Guides -> New Guide…) or percentage (via Image -> Guides -> New Guide (by Percent)…) values
  • position via a Selection (via Image -> Guides -> New Guides from Selection) … and today’s method of choice …
  • user long hover then drag of the rulers at the top and left for dynamic Horizontal and Vertical Guides respectively

Best for this is that you can see us doing this with YouTube video we made for the purpose on our MacBook Pro using QuickTime Player “File -> New Screen Recording” resultant presentation you can play below.

… and the resultant HTML code snippet, including our bits, produced looked like …


<!--HTML SNIPPET GENERATED BY GIMP
 
WARNING!! This is NOT a fully valid HTML document, it is rather a piece of
HTML generated by GIMP's py-slice plugin that should be embedded in an HTML
or XHTML document to be valid.
 
Replace the href targets in the anchor (<a >) for your URLS to have it working
as a menu.
 
 
Thanks for viewing.

-->
<table cellpadding="0" border="0" cellspacing="0">
<tr>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_0_0.jpg" style="width: 51px; height: 4px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_0_1.jpg" style="width: 70px; height: 4px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_0_2.jpg" style="width: 11px; height: 4px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_0_3.jpg" style="width: 164px; height: 4px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_0_4.jpg" style="width: 95px; height: 4px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_0_5.jpg" style="width: 110px; height: 4px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_0_6.jpg" style="width: 139px; height: 4px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_1_0.jpg" style="width: 51px; height: 128px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_1_1.jpg" style="width: 70px; height: 128px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_1_2.jpg" style="width: 11px; height: 128px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a title='blue' onclick="alert('Am I blue?');" href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_1_3.jpg" style="width: 164px; height: 128px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_1_4.jpg" style="width: 95px; height: 128px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_1_5.jpg" style="width: 110px; height: 128px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_1_6.jpg" style="width: 139px; height: 128px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_2_0.jpg" style="width: 51px; height: 14px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_2_1.jpg" style="width: 70px; height: 14px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_2_2.jpg" style="width: 11px; height: 14px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_2_3.jpg" style="width: 164px; height: 14px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_2_4.jpg" style="width: 95px; height: 14px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_2_5.jpg" style="width: 110px; height: 14px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_2_6.jpg" style="width: 139px; height: 14px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_3_0.jpg" style="width: 51px; height: 147px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_3_1.jpg" style="width: 70px; height: 147px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_3_2.jpg" style="width: 11px; height: 147px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_3_3.jpg" style="width: 164px; height: 147px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_3_4.jpg" style="width: 95px; height: 147px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a title='Blue' onclick="alert('Am i Blue?');" href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_3_5.jpg" style="width: 110px; height: 147px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_3_6.jpg" style="width: 139px; height: 147px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_4_0.jpg" style="width: 51px; height: 107px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_4_1.jpg" style="width: 70px; height: 107px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_4_2.jpg" style="width: 11px; height: 107px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_4_3.jpg" style="width: 164px; height: 107px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_4_4.jpg" style="width: 95px; height: 107px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_4_5.jpg" style="width: 110px; height: 107px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_4_6.jpg" style="width: 139px; height: 107px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_5_0.jpg" style="width: 51px; height: 78px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><a title='BLUE' onclick="alert('Am i BLUE?');" href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_5_1.jpg" style="width: 70px; height: 78px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_5_2.jpg" style="width: 11px; height: 78px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_5_3.jpg" style="width: 164px; height: 78px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_5_4.jpg" style="width: 95px; height: 78px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><a href="#"><img alt=" " src="blue_5_5.jpg" style="width: 110px; height: 78px; border-width: 0px;"></a></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_5_6.jpg" style="width: 139px; height: 78px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_6_0.jpg" style="width: 51px; height: 2px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_6_1.jpg" style="width: 70px; height: 2px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_6_2.jpg" style="width: 11px; height: 2px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_6_3.jpg" style="width: 164px; height: 2px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_6_4.jpg" style="width: 95px; height: 2px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_6_5.jpg" style="width: 110px; height: 2px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
<td><img alt=" " src="blue_6_6.jpg" style="width: 139px; height: 2px; border-width: 0px;"></td>
</tr>
</table>

We hope you find these GIMP “Slice and Dice” webpage creation ideas of interest.

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